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The Truth About Me & IBD: Part One

Cover Jpeg

To buy the paperback version of my book, click here

To buy the Kindle version of my book, click here

Anyone with IBD – whether they have Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis, whether they have a stoma, a J-pouch or all their insides intact, it doesn’t matter, we’ve all been in a situation where we’ve wanted the ground to swallow us up at some point, right? I mean, IBD is super embarrassing. It’s undignified. It’s painful, it’s disconcerting, it’s destructive, it’s stinky, it’s even more embarrassing than it was five seconds ago when I first typed ’embarrassing’. It’s a truly horrible disease. While our friends and family might be supportive of those of us inflicted with rotten insides, they will never truly get it.

One of the reasons that people don’t understand what we go through is that we probably don’t actually tell them. I mean, not in detail. That’s because the details are pretty grim and most of us (myself excepted) are too polite to talk about what’s going on within our intestines, never mind what comes out of them. So here it is: part one of a ‘this is the truth about you, me & IBD’. Feel free to share the link with your nearest and dearest. You might find they no longer find it weird that you cancel social activities at the last minute, or ask more questions than an SS interrogator when deciding whether or not to go to the zoo or out for lunch. Who knows, you might even get a biscuit out of it.

Brace yourself, for your bottom is about to become public property
No word of a lie. When we see our gastro consultant, not only do we have to be frank about how many times a day we go to the toilet and whether or not our stools are actually stools (or more like stagnant pond water, which is how I’ve described my ‘output’ in the past) we also have to put up with rectal examinations on a regular basis. I must have heard the line ‘OK Juliette, please draw your knees up to your chest and try to relax’ more times than I care to remember. Try to relax? You’re about to insert a plastic tube up my backside and INTO MY INTESTINES, you’re not handing me a cappuccino and a Vogue menthol. I am literally as far removed from relaxed as is possible right now. UGH.

Bring me this if you want me to relax, maybe

Bring me this if you want me to relax, maybe

I always say, ‘This is horrible for me. I mean, REALLY horrible. But you went to medical school for, like, 45 years and your reward is to spend your days sticking your fingers up diseased bottoms all day long. Er, you lose!’

You will ALWAYS need the toilet at the most inconvenient time
A few months after stoma surgery I went on ‘holiday’ to southern Ireland. I say ‘holiday’ in inverted commas because it was cold, wet and the food was so dreadful I thought I’d gone back to the seventies. Still, my boyfriend and I were staying in a nice little bed and breakfast place, so it wasn’t all bad. Or was it?

There I was, gaily helping myself to muesli, toast and orange juice at 9.00am before we set off on a nice drive through the countryside. An hour later and we’re halfway up a mountain when I suddenly feel a warm, heavy sensation in my groin, as though a cat has just climbed onto my lap.  I look down and see that my ileostomy bag is about to explode. ‘My bag’s about to explode!’ I said, in a panic, ‘Stop the ruddy car!’

We pulled over and I crouched down and emptied my bag behind a rock while my boyfriend busied himself looking at trees and stuff. I heard a ‘baa’ sound and looked up to see a flock of sheep giving me the stink eye.

'Excuse me, you can't do that here!'

‘Excuse me, you can’t do that here!’

When you need to go, you need to go, and I’m still surprised that the bag didn’t just fall off, so weighted was it with semi-digested oats and soya milk and toast and flipping raisins. Ugh.

muesli

This stuff weighs a TONNE when it’s wet – who knew?

A few weeks later I was in the toilet at a rock ‘n’ roll club when the power went off.  I was midway through emptying my ileostomy bag and no, I did not have a torch in my pocket and no again, I could not use the torch facility on my iPhone because it was 2002 and no such thing existed. To add to the fun, I had just noticed that there was no toilet paper. I sat in the pitch dark for 25 minutes with my bag dangling between my thighs, my dinner gloop slowly dripping into the toilet bowl until someone got the back-up generator working, I yelled for assistance and someone else brought me some toilet paper.

I should wear toilet roll as a hat, then I'd never be without it

I should wear toilet roll as a hat, then I’d never be without it

I now take tissues wherever I go, even in my own house. Better safe than sorry, right? Oh, and my boyfriend was annoyed because he couldn’t find me (one can’t help but think that he didn’t look very hard). Good times!

That’s enough for now. Coming up in part two: a hole in the ground is NOT a toilet, OK?

Martini On The Rocks, anyone?

Cover JpegTo buy the paperback version of my book, click here

To buy the Kindle version of my book, click here

Last month I described how much it hurt to inject Humira, the anti-TNF biologic which is prescribed for my ankylosing spondylitis and IBD. I scoured the internet for advice on how to reduce the pain, and found that most patients favoured numbing the injection site with an ice cube before injecting. Another patient’s nurse had advised that she rub either side of the site gently as the needle went in to increase blood flow and encourage the solution to dissipate more quickly. Someone else said that putting their leg up on a chair so it was straight, rather than bent, worked wonders. Frankly, I’d have hung upside down from a tree whilst smoking a cigar and counting to 100 in Mandarin if someone had suggested it.

Armed with that information in mind, I set up shop for my next injection. Believe me, I had to gear up to that all day. It’s like knowing you have to punch yourself in the face after dinner to give yourself a convincing black eye so you don’t have to go to work the next day. I mean, only a total mentalist would just go ahead and punch themselves in the face, right?

This time I poured myself a Martini, took a fake Cornetto from the freezer and decided to try out three new moves:

Right, let's do this

Right, let’s do this

Move One: I put my leg up on the chair, out straight rather than bent

Move Two: I rubbed the injection site gently either side of the needle as I pushed said needle into my thigh (this was harder than it sounds. I could have done with three hands at this point)

Move Three: Instead of trying to inject in one go, like I did with Enbrel, I thought some breathing exercises would help. I took a deep breath and exhaled as I pushed the plunger thing down for two seconds. I stopped for another two seconds, then did the same again. I was still on the verge of tears but puffing my breath and taking it slowly worked. It was maybe 30% less painful than before.

Two weeks later, I did all the same stuff but I also numbed the injection site with an ice-cube, swapped the fake Cornetto for some Lindt milk chocolate and substituted the Martini for a rather nice dessert wine.

Booze, drugs, legs

Booze, drugs, legs – like a scene from ‘Trainspotting’ only clean

I’m not sure if the ice, the dessert wine or Lindt were to blame (possibly none of the aforementioned) but I do know that it hurt more with a cold leg, so I scrubbed that move off the list.

Such a tiny bit of blood for something which hurts so berated

Pah – such a tiny bit of blood for something which hurts so flipping much!

My dead mink, Fried Eggs, then picked up the syringe and said he wanted to try it because, and I quote (no, really) that he ‘had a sore leg from falling out of bed’. I had to wrestle it from his little paw before he hurt himself. Kids, eh?

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Fried Eggs, no!

So there you have it. It still hurts, but a bit less. Really, I wouldn’t even do it if I didn’t have a treat at the end of it. That, and the fact that without it, I would die. I’m not being dramatic. I would die. The pain would be so agonising that I would end up throwing myself off a motorway bridge. Please don’t think I’m being glib about suicide; I’m not. I’ve been in that exact same situation and it was anti-TNF therapy which saved my life a decade ago, and is still doing so today.

That’s my ritual now. I inject, Gautier brings me a treat and afterwards we watch ‘Brooklyn 99’ on Netflix so I can laugh my head off rather than think, ‘OW OW OW OW OW MAN THAT STINGS’ for ages.

In other news, I fell off some rocks and acquired a salad spinner.

The salad spinner is my new friend; it’s made by a company called OXO who, in a nutshell, design everyday objects things better than other companies design everyday objects. If you’ve got fibromyalgia or arthritis in your arms, spinning salad is quite an effort (although granted, not one you probably make that often). I can’t even eat salad very often as I can’t digest it, but when I do, I use this. It has a clever button which does all the work for you while you stand there resting your arms and saying ‘Keep going, little spinner!’ Even their vegetable peelers glide over carrots like a dream; never thought I’d find pleasure in a peeler but I do. If you’re in pain, every effort hurts, so it’s worth investing in items which reduce that. If you’re not in pain, you’ll still have fun spinning salad. You can thank me later.

As for the rocks, Gautier and I were at a seaside town north of Bordeaux called Royan which we didn’t much like. I was in my bamboo ensemble: bamboo bag, bamboo earrings, bamboo bangles, bamboo-ish dress with bamboo buttons; here’s me taking a photo of myself in the loo, doing my best stupid idiot face into the mirror:

Bamboo overload

Bamboo overload

It turns out Royan didn’t much like me either; after a lovely dinner at a beach side restaurant at sunset, I suggested we go for a little walk on the sand. There I was, full to bursting with fish goujons and chips and so happy to be back by the sea (I miss Brighton so much I can’t tell you). Anyway, I digress. Here is my dinner:

Yum! Everything was going so well...

Yum! Everything was going so well…

Looks perfect for a midnight stroll, doesn’t it? That’s what I thought.

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I was well excited about the sand

Granted, I’d had a cocktail which must have clouded my judgement somewhat, but here’s what happened: I attempted to climb over a low wall, onto some giant rocks, then step down to the sand. Gautier was helping me. It should have been one, two, three steps and landed. Unfortunately, what I had thought was sand was, in fact, a massive, flat rock which was just looked – under the midnight sky – like sand.

Needless to say I lost my balance and was catapulted onto my left shoulder and my FACE. Yes, my face. My right leg went from under me and my foot scraped itself on the rock. Thankfully my face found a bit of sand rather than rock. I was holding my tiny bear, Chips, in my left hand. He screamed, I screamed and my aim was to save him from hitting the sand, so I held him aloft, which upset my balance even further. What a div.

Gautier picked me up and told me off. He is like that; he tells me off first, then asks if I’m OK. I wasn’t OK; my foot was bleeding and I did a cry.

Off we went, back to the hotel (which was fortunately about 20 feet away), with my sandal in one hand and a very traumatised Chips in the other. I limped back to our room and did the first aid bit. Gautier enjoys pouring white spirit on cuts and grazes; I was pushed over by a strong wind once and grazed the hell out of my hands. He just threw this stuff on them like a torturer would. I was squealing like a stuck pig. Man, that stuff BURNS. Chips wanted to help, so he put the plaster on.

Poor Chips; he was so upset but stayed calm to administer first aid

Poor Chips; he was so upset but stayed calm to administer first aid

Great job, Chips!

Great job, Chips!

The next day I limped about even more than I usually limp about, and wondered aloud my shoulder hurt so much. ‘Because you fell on it,’ Gautier reminded me. By day two, I could barely stand on it as the bruise started to come out. On day three I got bitten by something in the garden (not a camel, more likely a spider) on the same foot, which then blew up like a hideous sausage.

At one point I thought I was going to have to saw it off; fortunately some anti-histamines and a herbal concoction from the mother-in-law’s medicine cabinet saved me from that. Hallelujah.

This week I am mostly attempting not to injure myself or get bitten.

I’ll let you know how I get on.

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